Choose your tour destination

on the Conference

 

2019 ICMDA EA Seoul, Korea

Attendee to Pre-Conference or Main-Conference should choose your tour destination. So we introduce tour destination, choose one per conference type which was registered by you.

[Contents]

Pre-Conference

@ Daegu Dongsan Hospital······································· 2

A Wonju Christian Hospital······································· 7

B Jeonju Jesus Hospital·············································· 9

C Kwangju Christian Hospital·································· 17

Main-Conference

@ Cemetery Tours···················································· 27

A Museum Tours······················································ 30

B Hospital Tours······················································ 41

Pre-Conference

 

[Tours choice]

@ Daegu Dongsan Hospital

A Wonju Christian Hospital

B Jeonju Jesus Hospital

C Kwangju Christian Hospital

 

1. Daegu Dongsan Hospital

Address : 424, Dongsan-dong, Jung-gu, Daegu

Homepage : http://www.dsmc.or.kr/eng/, http://www.dsmc.or.kr/

Introduce in Western Medicine in Daegu-Gyeongbuk

Christianity was first introduced in Daegu in April 1893 when the US Presbyterian missionary William B. Baird (1862-1931), along with preacher Se Gyeongjo, went on a missionary trip in the northern Gyeongsangdo and spread gospel. The following year, the missionary team visited Daegu again and decided it was an important place as a strategic base, before they opened Nammunan Church (currently Jaeil Church).

Meanwhile, during this period, the American missionary Dr. Woodbridge O. Johnson (1869 1951) was on medical mission under the title eAmerican Pharmacy,f and in 1899, he opened eJaejungwonf inside Jaeil Church to provide medical service. The pharmacy and Jaejungwon became Keimyung University DSMC later. Initially founded as Jaejungwon, DSMC marked the beginning of modern medicine in Daegu as well as social, economic, cultural, and educational modernization in the region.

 

The 1st director, Missionary Johnson

Dr. Johnson, the missionary who founded Jaejungwon, was the first medical missionary dispatched by the US Presbyterian Church to Daegu, and acquired various Korean names such as Jang Incha, Jang Euisa, and Jang Orin. From 1989 to 1910, he served as the first director of Jaejungwon. After receiving his treatment, more and more patients became Christian: among them were a former Buddhist monk, the first patient who received eye surgery, and well-known thief. On June 2, 1909, Missionary Johnson successfully performed Cesarean section and saved the mother and baby. This incidence quickly made him famous. After his leprosy treatment became widely known, leprosy patients constantly came to the hospital. Johnson decided to use one of the hanoks (traditional Korean houses) only for leprosy treatment, as part of his practice of Christian love.

Between 1908 and 1909, Missionary Johnson selected 7 young Korean men who were working at Jaejungwon and taught them medicine, which became an important even in the history of Daegu and modern medicine in Korea. In addition, the apple tree he ordered from the US and planted in the backyard of his house in Daegu has left a new tree that is still preserved in DSMC. This tree, which made Daegu a city of apples, has been designated as Daegu Nurse Tree no.1.

 

American Pharmacy and Jaejungwon

Missionary Johnson came to Daegu riding a pony, on December 25, 1897. Two years later, in 1899, he turned a small cottage that used to be occupied by servants into what he named eAmerican Pharmacyf and began to distribute medicine to local people. This was the first modern medical service provided in Daegu. Subsequently, he ordered medicine from the US and began to offer treatment full-time, under the name eJaejungwon.f

Jaejungwon was devided into three sections: a small doctorfs office, large room which was divided into pharmacy ad operation room, and a warehouse that was smaller than the other rooms. From the opening until the summer the following year, the hospital treated 1,700 patients, 800 of which were new patients, 50 surgery recipients, and 80 house-call patients. Between 1901 and 1902, the total number of patients reached 2,000. At that time, Korea was in the midst of chaos as its sovereignty was threatened by the Western Powers and Japanese. The number of patients with leprosy, pneumonia, malaria, and parasites rose rapidly. And Jaejungwon tried to share the pain and hardship and grow with Korean people, through leprosy patient aid program, endemic treatment, smallpox vaccination, and healthcare awareness campaign.

 

Dire Environment of Jaejungwon

Jaejungwon, being located inside a 7m embankment in Eupseong, Daegu, had poor ventilation. And the low, narrow ceiling meant the indoor temperature rose unbearably high during the summer, to an extent the doctors were concerned of their own health. Missionary Johnson said, gIt is so small and stifling that, during summer, doctors have to risk their own health in order to work here.h The missionaries summarized the hardship at Jaejungwon as e3S.f

The first S was smell. In Daegu, the stream from Apsan Mountain flew into Dalseocheon, which continues to Gyesandong and Dongsandong, causing flood during the rainy season every year. Garbage moved from the upstream would overflow in front of the missionary house, producing such foul smell. The second S was smoke. At that time, Koreans used to burn wood to cook, so, every morning and evening, the missionary district surrounded by the local fortress of Daegu was filled with smoke. The third S, sound, was also challenging for the missionaries, as the dogs barked, women beat the laundry as a way to straighten the clothes, and, especially, shaman performed rituals all night long.

 

Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center

From 1906, Missionary Johnson relocated Jaejungwon to its current address in Dongsandong. And then, the second director of the hospital, Missionary Fletcher changed the name to Dongsan Hospital. Despite the hardship and challenges during Japanese Occupation, Dongsan Hospital grew to become a general hospital, improving its scientific diagnosis and treatment methods for the increasing number of patients. In addition to conducting childrenfs welfare campaign, the hospital opened a nurse training program in 1924, which has eventually turned into the current nursing school at Keimyung University, contributing to nursing education in South Korea.

Since the Korean War, Dongsan Hospital opened Koreafs first childrenfs hospital and offered free treatment for war orphans, becoming widely known across the country for prescribing drugs that were hard to find in Korea at that time. The 7th director, Missionary Moffett served for 46 years at the hospital, expanding the institution as well as introducing modern medical equipment. Indeed, during the 1960s and 1970s, the hospital saw remarkable improvement in its medical competence. In 1980, Dongsan Hospital was merged with Keimyung University, a top Christian educational institution in the region, and opened a medical school, before changing its name to Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center (DSMC) in 1982. As a result, it became one of the top medical institutions in South Korea that offers treatment, mission, and even education and research. Currently, DSMC is building a new patient-oriented hospital with 20 story and 5 underground floors (with 1,033 beds), modeling after the top 8 hospitals in the US including Johns Hopkins University Hospital. This new, environmentally-friendly hospital, which is to be completed by 2018, was designed based on JCI certificate (for the facility), and state-of-art intelligent system, as a top medical institution in Daegu, the eMedi City.f

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. Wonju Christian Hospital

Address : 20, Ilsan-ro, Wonju-si, Gangwon-do

Homepage : https://www.ywmc.or.kr/web/eng/, https://www.ywmc.or.kr/

 

 

1910 was the 25th anniversary year of the American Methodist Church's Korean mission. To commemorate this, hospital establishment in Wonju was promoted. In 1911, A. G. Anderson was dispatched to Korea as the director of this project. The hospital construction was completed in November 1913 at the 116 Ilsan-dong, Wonju. It was two-stroy red brick building with basement and 17 beds. Hospital was built with donations from Swedish Methodist church members who had immigrated to USA, so it was called eThe Swedish Methodist Hospital)f or eSeomigam Hospitalf according to donators.

As the only general hospital in Yeongseo and southern regions of Gangwon province, the Seomigam Hospital became a base for spreading the gospel, though the scale was not large. After Dr. Anderson moved to Pyongyang Giho Hospital, the hospital was closed temporarily. In 1925, a missionary S. McManis came in and took the hospital again. The operation of the hospital was activated by him and Korean medical staffs. The Seomigam Hospital, which had been operating for about 20 years and served as a mission hospital for local residents, was closed in 1933 due to circumstance of the United Methodist Church.

The United Methodist Mission has planned to build a hospital in Wonju after the liberation.

In 1954, the United Methodist Church sent Missionary C.W.Judy to Wonju, and he conducted a campaign to reclaim Mission site at Ilsan-dong. In 1955, Missionary T. R. Larwood was appointed as the head of hospital construction and management. The hospital construction began in 1957 supported by the United Methodist Relief Committee and the United Methodist Mission, the United Church of Canada Mission, and the United Nations Commission for the Unification and Rehabilitation of Korea, UNCURK Conference. The building was completed on October 3, 1959 with 50 beds having a basement and two floors above the ground.

In 1976, the Hospital Foundation merged with the Yonsei University Foundation.

In 1977, the Wonju Branch of Yonsei University College of Medicine was promoted to Wonju College of Medicine in 1982. In 1983, it was transformed into the Wonju Christian Hospital of Wonju College of Medicine, Yonsei University. It is the largest university hospital in the central region with 1,000 beds. In 2013, the name changed to Wonju Severance Christian Hospital.

 

출처 : 한국민족문화대백과(한국학중앙연구원)

 

3. Jeonju Jesus Hospital

Address : 365, Seowon-ro, Wansan-gu, Jeonju-si, Jeollabuk-do

Homepage : http://www.jesushospital.com/ClinicHome/Index.asp?sClinicIDX=31

http://www.jesushospital.com/

The Presbyterian medical center in Jeonju, Korea, has been fulfilling its role of providing medical care and proclaiming the gospel for 112 years, beginning from the opening of a dispensary on November 3, 1898 by Dr. Mattie B. Ingold, a woman physician from Hickory, North Carolina in the United States of America. After graduating first in her class at Baltimore Women's Medical College, she prepared herself for a missionary career and, at age 30, left for Korea on July 18, 1897, traveling to a country which was in turmoil and had not yet recovered from the scars of the Tong-Hak Revolution. At her farewell service at the First Presbyterian Church of Rock Hill, S.C., she said, "I do not fear what may befall me. I am in God's keeping and nothing can come to me without His permission and whatever his sends is right and good."

After four months of a long and rough voyage, she arrived in Jeonju and was assigned by the Presbyterian Mission to live in a ordinary, small Korean house with mud walls and straw-thatched roof in Eun-Song Li, outside the Jeonju City castle-gates. After

 

studying the Korean language for 1 year, she opened the door of her simple dispensary for treatment of women and children. This was the modest beginning of the Presbyterian Medical Center on November 3, 1898. In 1902, the first western-style outpatient clinic was built for her by a fellow-missionary, the Rev. William B. Harrison. In 1903, Dr. Wylie H. Forsythe was appointed to serve at this dispensary in Jeonju. After his arrival in Jeonju, his deep and unceasing devotion to the care of the sick, the underprivileged, and leprosy patients became well known but he had to withdraw from the field due to injuries by Tong-Hak Revolution. In 1912, the third hospital director, Dr. Thomas H. Daniel, built a clean, tidy 30-bed hospital which served well until it was destroyed by fire in 1935 while Dr. Lloyd K. Boggs was director. The hospital was rebuilt by Dr. Boggs the following year with the help of many church people in the Jeonju community.

 

 

In 1940, the hospital was closed for 8 years as a consequence of Japanese colonial coercion when authorities compelled all christians and their institutions to bow at Shinto Shrines. In 1950, the hospital was closed temporarily due to the Korean War. In spite of the years of instability, the hospital made every effort to fulfill its role as a witness to Jesus Christ by practicing christian love in the community and beyond. In 1947, Dr. Paul S. Crane, the 7th hospital director, returned to Korea where he had grown up as a boy, and with the concurrence of the Mission, conducted (with Miss Margaret Pritchard, R.N.) a tour of the five hospitals built by the Southern Presbyterian Church in Southwest Korea. Dr. Crane and' Miss Pritchard concluded that the hospital in Jeonju should be developed into a teaching hospital, and received Mission approval. The doors of the newly named Presbyterian Medical Center were opened on April 1, 1948.

 

The Nursing College, under the leadership of Miss Pritchard, opened its doors on July 1, 1950, only to have to close due to the outbreak of the Korean War. This made necessary the evacution of the hospital in advance of the communist forces' invasion, and escaping to Pusan. Dr. Crane returned after the southern part of the peninsula was liberated, and became deeply involved in the care of war casualties and orphans. He also resumed the plans for development of the hospital into a teaching and educational institution for training doctors and nurses. In 1954, Dr. and Mrs. David Seel arrived to help, he as a surgeon, and she as a medical technologist. Ms. Janet Talmage became superintendent of Nurses when Ms. Pritchard became Dean of the Nursing School. Dr. Frank Keller, a pediatrician, arrivied in 1956, followed by Miss Ocie Respess, a medical technologist, Ms. Betty Boyer, R.N., Ms. Patricia Heilig, R.N., and later Ms. Pat Whitener, R.N., Among our national staff members, Dr. Andrew Young-Hoon Park was a strong spiritual leader and also one of the first sabbatical fellows-he trained in America in neurosurgery-to head a clinical department.

 

During these pioneer days there occurred a memorable event when a 9-year-old child was deposited on the hospital doorstep acutely ill with bowel obstruction due to parasites. A surgical procedure was performed to remove the parasites, and when the worms were counted it was found that there were 1,063 roundworms blocking the small intestine. Unfortunately, due to the child's weakened condition, he did not survive. But under Dr. Crane's initiative, a nationwide-movement was launched to fight infestation by intestinal parasites, which campaign is said to have been very effective.

 

Following the suggestion of a certain christian elder from Samnae, the name of the hospital was changed to 'Yesu Pyungwon' . Until then it had used Chinese characters which were pronounced 'Yaso Pyungwon' . The elder recognized the importance of using the common-place name in accord with Korean christian usage rather than the Chinese character derivative.

 

As the hospital program grew and comprehensive care was provided, specialists were trained not only in the major specialties of internal medicine, surgery, pediatric and obstetric/gynecology, but also in subspecialties such as clinical pathology, anatomical pathology, radiology, urology, and neurosurgery. Dr. See I received training in surgical oncology in 1958-60 and returned to PMC to launch the Tumor Clinic.

 

Although the Presbyterian medical center was the first modern hospital in the province, its site on Taga Hill was inadequate, providing no room for expansion. Dr. Frank Keller suggested obtaining a plot of ground which had been used as a primary school by the Mission, but which had to be closed when the government took over all elementary education. Dr. Keller, who married Miss Talmage in 1955, died of cerebrovascular hemorrhage in 1967, and is buried in the Mission Cemetery in Jeonju. His love for Korean children is yet remembered. A campaign to raise funds through the Women's Birthday Offering of the Southern Prebyterian Church was launched. Dr. Crane began negotiations with the Protestant Central Agency of West Germany for major development funds. After 4 years of discussions and negotiation with this agency, a grant of 5 million Deutschemark was approved on October 10, 1969. Prior to this time, Dr. Crane had retired from the directorship and returned to America. When the news of the German Grant was received, Dr Seel, now Director said, 'Ring the Chapel Bell!'

 

Construction of the new hospital (initially 5 floors above ground) was completed in 1971. When people saw this hospital they called it 'The Miracle of Dragon-Head Ridge' . Additions since the basic construction include the Medical Library, the Emergency Care Center, the Maternity Ward and Neonatal Unit, completion of the 6th and 7th floors, construction of the Rehabilitation Center, and the Intensive Care Unit. In 1968, a comprehensive community health program was launched by Dr. John K. Wilson, beginning in Tong Sang Township and extended to Soyang and Yongjin Townships. The program included community development and sanitation, an antituberculosis campaign, a poliomyelitis prevention project, and adult medical care of a rural area which had not been cared for by the government public health program. In 1982, a small branch hospital and a rehabilitation center in Kosan were built to provide community health to these rural areas. In 1972, Dr. John Shaw, an orthopedic surgeon, and his wife, Sharon, an occupational therapist, joined the staff, not only to care for children and adults with orthopedic problems, but also to develop the program of rehabilitation medicine. This led to the building of the first inpatient rehabilitation ward in Korea, construction and equipment having been donated by the Office of American Schools and Hospitals Aboard.

 

The year 1979 was the turning point for this hospital which moved forward from being a 'missionary receiving hospital' to a 'missionary sending hospital' to other more needy countries. In 1979, Dr. Yong-Ung Lee, an internist, was sent to Bangladesh as a medical missionary. Since then, more than 20 doctors and nurses from this hospital have served or are still serving overseas in projects in many underprivileged countries, including providing emergency care facilities for refugees in Rwanda.

 

The tumor registry program and the tumor clinic which had been instituted in 1963 became the basis for the plan to establish the Cancer Center. This long-range plan supported by the construction, in 1985, of the Christian Medical Research Center where studies in nuclear medicine now offer new insights into the cause of several major cancers. In the same year, 1985, the radiation therapy department was strengthened by the acquisition of a linear accelerator. Plans for the future onclude construction of a Cancer Center for both ambulatory and inpatient care, where patients can be evaluated and cared for under multidisciplinary management In 1987, Dr. Young-Tae Chung became the first Korean hospital director. In 1991, Dr. EulSam Chung was elected the 14th director, who tried to maintain financial stability. In 1995, Dr. Young-Hee Goh was elected the 15th director.

In 1996, Dr. Young-Tae Chung the 16th. In April 1998, Dr. Yong-Ung Lee the 17th. In July 2001, Dr. Bong-Ok You the 18th. In July 2004, Dr Min Chul Kim the 19th. In June 2010, Dr. ChangYoung Kweon has been elected 21th director, who manage the Presbyterian medical center 112 years old.

 

Our hospital has continued to offer superior medical care, at the forefront of the changing times. Our founder, Dr. Matty Ingold, began this hospital, healing and saving many lives in Korea with her hand of mercy.

 

Presbyterian medical center was the first to distribute basic health care over a century ago, and we have continued to raise the bar for modern and specialized medical treatment. We have been instrumental in raising Koreafs standard of life.

 

Presbyterian medical centerfs mission is based on an ancient love fused with cutting-edge technology. We are up to date with HIS, PACS, and MIS medical information sharing systems.

 

Presbyterian medical center constantly strives to be current with word-class standardization, integration, modernization, education, and research. Through such efforts, we have transformed into a real?time digital hospital.

 

We take pride in our cardiology, transplant, and experimental track record along with our G.I. diagnostics and our high?pain management center.

 

We have made thankful and exhaustive use of our PET-CT unit, allowing us to make early detection of many cancers and diseases. Our VMAT accelerator has reduced a great deal of suffering in our oncology department, allowing highly pinpointed, site?specific radiation treatment. Our clients have endured much lower side?effects, and much higher satisfaction.

 

In 2005, we became the nationfs first general hospital NGO, geared to overseas medical mission. We founded People for Medical Cooperation (PMC). PMC leads and encourages changes and upgrades in mission?medicine around the world, putting flesh on the words, glove thy neighbor.h

 

Several support organizations help maintain the christian ministry at the hospital. The Cancer Patient Support Association is a compassionate ministry which helps patient's families financially, socially and spiritually. The PMC Mission Society operates with funds contributed by hospital employees for medical care in doctorless village, and supports aged people, the unemployed, and patients needing cataract surgery. Presently, Dr. ChangYoung Kweon, the president of the Presbyterian medical center, with his strong innovative will in hospital management and the sacrifical efforts of the entire hospital staff, along with Gods Provisions are doing their best with a spirit as a debtor to medical and mission service which has now been entrusted to us by the Lord We, the entire staff of the hospital, must not forget Dr. Mattie Ingold's "first love" and must renew our resolution on the interitance and maintenance of this spirit of the establishment of this medical and evangelical institution and its development Although presently are faced with various difficulties, we will overcome them and uplift the glorious reputation of the hospital with scent of mercy and love.

 

 

 

 

 

 

4. Kwangju Christian Hospital

Address : 37, Yangnim-ro, Nam-gu, Gwangju

Homepage : http://www.kch.or.kr/eng/ http://www.kch.or.kr/

Tel. 82-62-650-5000

 

 

Welcome to the Kwangju Christian Hospital

 

 

Kwangju Christian Hospital(KCH) was the founder of modern medical science in Gwangju city with the establishment of Jejungwon, Kwangju Clinic in 1905 by missionary Dr. Nolan and has been serving the national health for the last 101 years as the leading organization among the medical institutions in South Korea.


The hospital, a 578-bed state-of-the-art care hospital, provides comprehensive health care services to its local communities and manages the Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Center, Cardio-Vascular Center, Children Rehabilitation Center, Emergency Care Center, Day Surgery Center, Health & Wellness Center and Tuberculosis Center. KCH is noted for its well-developed, extensive set of diagnostic infrastructure that includes the Order Communication System(OCS), Picture Archiving and Communications System (PACS), and Clinical Laboratory Automation System. Also, it is one of major referral and treatment health care facilities for patients throughout the Gwangju Metropolitan City. With more than 140 physicians, 700 employees and 50 volunteers, the hospital has over 480,000 outpatients visits and 180,000 admissions annually.

 

Preparing for the second century of its mission, KCH calls on the belief and enthusiasm of the 840 staff members, aiming to give as much love in the next 100 years as was received in the last 100 years. Under its new missions, the Hospital established a Hospice Ward to take care of terminally ill cancer patients.

 

To practice sharing the love we have received, all the staff of the Hospital actively participate in a holistic human touch campaign. Our goal is to become the best hospital of holistic human touch in South Korea. Also, we are making every effort to help patients to feel comfortable in the hospital environment by continuously improving our hospital's facilities and environment.

 

MISSION and VISION

 

The Mission of KCH

 

To become a top-notch Christian Medical Institution in the world which carries out medical service as well as medical mission work through life-respecting medical performance with the love of Jesus Christ.

 

 

The Vision of KCH

 

1. Medical Mission Work through Life-Respecting Performance

2. Patient-Centered Holistic Healing

3. Best Hospital for Patients' Safety

 

ACHIEVEMENT

 

History of Achievement

 

Started a modern medical treatment as the first Westernized hospital in Gwangju, 1905

Started missions to people with leprosy, 1909

Began dental treatment, 1923

Established a tuberculosis specialty treatment center in 1930

Established a nursing school, 1932

The pioneer cytogenetic research in Korea, 1974

The first experience in Gwangju or Honam area for

Blood Exchange Transfusion(1968), Total Hip Arthroplasty(1974), Laparoscopic Operation(1975), Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography(1973), Hemodialysis(1983), etc.

Established a Health & Wellness Center, 1991

Established a Children Rehabilitation Center, 2006

 

Good Influences to Gwangju and Jeonnam

 

1. Evangelism: Spread the gospel through the medical mission

2. Examine patients: Changed from shamanism to modern medical treatment

3. Social Service: Humanistic charitable service

4. Education: Training people in medicine and nursing and medical technicians

5. Public Health: Prevention medicine

6. Being the pioneer spirit in the Gwangju area

 

HISTORY

 

1905 Missionary Dr. J. W. Nolan, the first director, opened Kwangju Jejungwon on November 20.

1908 Missionary Dr. R. M. Wilson became the second director.

1909 Missions to people with leprosy were started.

1911 Ellen-Lavine Graham Hospital was built.

1912 A leper colony was built.

1923 A dental office was opened by missionary Dr. J. K. Levie.

1930 Missionary Dr. L. C. Brand became the third director and devoted himself to the elimination of tuberculosis.

1933 Ellen-Lavine Graham Hospital was destroyed by a fire.

1934 A two-story fire proof building with a central heating system was constructed to continue mission works.

1940 Missionary Dr. J. F. Preston, Jr. became the fourth director. In November, Ellen-Lavine Graham Hospital was closed by the Japanese Empire.

1951 Missionary Dr. H. A. Codington was appointed as the fifth director in September and reopened the hospital.

1955 A new tuberculosis ward was built.

1963 Missionary Dr. D. H. Neuisma reopened dental office.

1965 Ellen-Lavine Graham Hospital was accredited as an intern training and general hospital.

1966 Missionary Dr. W. L. Simpson became the sixth director.

1967 Missionary Dr. R. B. Dietrick was appointed as the seventh director.

1976 Dr. Chin Duk Huh became the eighth director. He was the first Korean director.

1988 A Mother-Child Health Center was built.

1991 The Emergency Center and Health & Wellness Center were newly built.

1996 Dr. Ki Bok Kim became the ninth director.

1998 Dr. Ju Sup Park became the tenth director.

2000 The Order Communication System(OCS) was developed.

2001 The Operating Room, Wilson Hall, Intensive Care Unit, Labor Room, NICU, Engine Room, and Transformer Substation were extended and moved to their present locations.

2002 Dr. Kyung Euy Song was appointed as the eleventh director.

2003 The Hospice ward was newly opened.

2004 Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Center and Micro Reconstructive Surgery Center were newly opened.

2005 Day Surgery Center was newly opened. The hospital celebrated its Centennial Anniversary with old missionaries and their families.

2006 Children Rehabilitation Center was newly opened.

2007 Dr. Byung Ran Park became the twelfth director.

2015 Lobby floor was rebuilt and the lobby entrance was built.

2017 The Building in the West Ward has been enlarged.

Jejung Museum opened.

2018 Dr. Yong Soo Choi became the thirteenth director.

 

 

Medical Departments

 

Cardiology

Endocrinology & Metabolism

Gastroenterology

Nephrology

Hematology and Oncology

Pulmonology

Rheumatology

Infectious disease

Tuberculosis

Surgery

Pediatrics

Obstetrics & Gynecology

Orthopedic Surgery

Otorhinolaryngology

Thoracic Surgery

Neurosurgery

Neurology

Psychiatry

Urology

Dermatology

Ophthalmology

Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation

Family Medicine

Emergency Medicine

Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine

Radiology

Laboratory Medicine

Surgical Pathology

Nuclear Medicine

Dentistry

 

 

 

[Yanghwajin Foreign Missionary Cemetery(Attend all)]

Address : 144 Hapjeongdong, Mapo-gu, Seoul

Homepage : http://www.yanghwajin.net/

Empress Min(1851-1895) and member of her clan brought down the regency of Daewongun and made Emperor Gojong(1852-1919) the ruler of Joseon in his own right. Emperor Gojong abandoned the isolation policy of Joseon and began to build ties with other countries, During such changes, Protestant missionaries, mostly from English-speaking countries, started to arrive at Jaemulpo port to deliver the Gospel to Joseon.

In 1884, Doctor H.N. Allen saved Min, Young Ik, a relative of the royalty, who was injured during the Gapsinjeungbyun. As a result, foreign missionaries came to form a close relationship with the royal families, which then led to the establishment of Gwanghyewon(House of Extended Grace). Gwanghyewon was the first modern hospital in Korea and the predecessor of Severance Hospital.

During that time, however, missionaries were not allowed to openly spread the Gospel due to the Korean government's ban of freign religions. Therefore, missionaries sought to penetrate Korean society through other initiaives such as medical practice, education, and social works. Because the missionaries had to rely on indirect, system-wide initiatives to advance the goals of their mission, rather than engaging in evangelism that targeted individuals, the development of Korean Church later came have to have a deep bearing on the history of Korea

In 1887, Dr. J.W. Heron became the superintendent of Gwanghyewon, following Dr. Allen. While Dr. Heron was taking care of patients suffering from epidemic dysentery, he himself became infected and passed away on July 26, 1890, at the age of 34. After his death, searching for a suitable location for his burial became an urgent issue, because it was impossible to carry Dr. heron's remains to Jaemulpo(the only site used as foreigners' cemetery) in the hot summer days.

Therefore, the families of Dr. Heron and foreign missionaries asked for a burial place near Hansung (the old name of Seoul) through a U.S. Diplomat, Augustine Heard. A few tyears before the death of Dr. Heron, Joseon had entered into the Korean-British Treaty of Amity and Commerce under which Joseon Promised to provide a plot of land for a foreigners' cemetery free-of-charge within the boundaries of the trade zone. Based on the "Most Favored Nation" treatment clause under the Korean-American Treaty, Mr. Heard requested a burial place for Dr. Heron in the vicinity of Hansung. After the exchange of several urgent letters between Mr. Heard and Mr. Min, Jong-Mook(then Secretary of Joseon Foreign and Trade Affairs), Yanghwajin was Joseon as the burial ground.

 

Total Area : 13,224m²

Number & Nationality of Persons Interred          : 417persons/15countries

(AUS, CAN, DEN, FRA, GBR, GER, ITA, JPN, KOR, NZL, PHI, RSA, RUS, SWE, USA)

Number & Nationality of Missionaries Interred(including family members)          : 145persons/6countries (AUS, CAN, GBR, RSA, SWE, USA)

First Missionary Interred : J.W. Heron

Managed and maintained : 100th Anniversary Memorial Church

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Main-Conference

 

[Tours choice]

@Cemetery Tours / AMuseum Tours / BHospital Tours

 

@ Cemetery Tours

 

1. Yanghwajin Foreign Missionary Cemetery

Address : 144 Hapjeongdong, Mapo-gu, Seoul

 

Empress Min(1851-1895) and member of her clan brought down the regency of Daewongun and made Emperor Gojong(1852-1919) the ruler of Joseon in his own right. Emperor Gojong abandoned the isolation policy of Joseon and began to build ties with other countries, During such changes, Protestant missionaries, mostly from English-speaking countries, started to arrive at Jaemulpo port to deliver the Gospel to Joseon.

In 1884, Doctor H.N. Allen saved Min, Young Ik, a relative of the royalty, who was injured during the Gapsinjeungbyun. As a result, foreign missionaries came to form a close relationship with the royal families, which then led to the establishment of Gwanghyewon(House of Extended Grace). Gwanghyewon was the first modern hospital in Korea and the predecessor of Severance Hospital.

During that time, however, missionaries were not allowed to openly spread the Gospel due to the Korean government's ban of freign religions. Therefore, missionaries sought to penetrate Korean society through other initiaives such as medical practice, education, and social works. Because the missionaries had to rely on indirect, system-wide initiatives to advance the goals of their mission, rather than engaging in evangelism that targeted individuals, the development of Korean Church later came have to have a deep bearing on the history of Korea

In 1887, Dr. J.W. Heron became the superintendent of Gwanghyewon, following Dr. Allen. While Dr. Heron was taking care of patients suffering from epidemic dysentery, he himself became infected and passed away on July 26, 1890, at the age of 34. After his death, searching for a suitable location for his burial became an urgent issue, because it was impossible to carry Dr. heron's remains to Jaemulpo(the only site used as foreigners' cemetery) in the hot summer days.

Therefore, the families of Dr. Heron and foreign missionaries asked for a burial place near Hansung (the old name of Seoul) through a U.S. Diplomat, Augustine Heard. A few tyears before the death of Dr. Heron, Joseon had entered into the Korean-British Treaty of Amity and Commerce under which Joseon Promised to provide a plot of land for a foreigners' cemetery free-of-charge within the boundaries of the trade zone. Based on the "Most Favored Nation" treatment clause under the Korean-American Treaty, Mr. Heard requested a burial place for Dr. Heron in the vicinity of Hansung. After the exchange of several urgent letters between Mr. Heard and Mr. Min, Jong-Mook(then Secretary of Joseon Foreign and Trade Affairs), Yanghwajin was Joseon as the burial ground.

 

Total Area : 13,224m²

Number & Nationality of Persons Interred             : 417persons/15countries

(AUS, CAN, DEN, FRA, GBR, GER, ITA, JPN, KOR, NZL, PHI, RSA, RUS, SWE, USA)

Number & Nationality of Missionaries Interred(including family members) : 145persons/6countries (AUS, CAN, GBR, RSA, SWE, USA)

First Missionary Interred : J.W. Heron

Managed and maintained : 100th Anniversary Memorial Church

 

Reference : Yanghwajin Foreign Missionary Cemetery

 

A Museum Tours

 

1. APPENZELLER / Noble Memorial Museum

(Pai chai Hakdang)

Address : 19, Seosomun-ro 11gil, Jung-gu, Seoul

 

Pai chai Hakdang, the first modernized educational institution in Korea, was established by an American missionary. Henry Gerhart Appenzeller(1858-1902) in 1885. King Gojong issued a state edict of approbation of this place. naming it 'Pai Chai Hakdang' in 1887.

 

1. Pai Chai Hakdang Classroom

In the Museum, visitors can experience the reproduction of a typical school classroom in the 1930's, with the original stone-chalkboard and the replicas of desks and chairs used at the time. With visual aid, the public can understand the vision of Appenzeller's all-round education as well as the global education curriculum of Pai Chai Hakdang, which was first carried out in this school 120 years ago.

 

2. Birth of the Pai Chai Hakdang and its Educational Motto

Exhibition hall is a space where one can face the first modernized educational institution in korea. Pai Chai Hakdang. There are the wooden tablet that inscribed the calligraphy of the school name. "Pai Chai Hakdang" given by King Gojong, the book, Seoyougyeonmoon("Travel to Western countries") written by Gil-jung Yoo with his autograph, early textbooks published by the students of Pai Chai Hakdang Printing Press, history of the first student council Hyupsung Forum and the description of the way it developed into the League of Independence that led the nationalist movement.

 

3. Early Missionaries

In exhibition hall 2, visitors can see the missionaries who came to Korea from the late 19th toi early 20th century. There are photographs of missionaries showing their educational and religious activities mostly in Jeongdong area which was the center of modern age Seoul.

 

4. Family of William Arthur Noble

William Arthur Noble used to be a teacher at Pai Chai Hakdang. He moved to Pyeongyang and contributed to the spread of Christianity in the city. His wife Mattie Wilcox Noble devoted Herself to women's education and the Sunday school. There are journals. English novels Ewa and Sunie written by William Arthur Noble, and various pictures of the family's lives in Pyeongyang.

 

5. The founder of Pai Chai Hakdang, Henry Gerhart Appenzeller

In exhibition hall 2-3, visitors can look through Henry Gerhart Appenzeller'se missionary trips, establishment of Pai Chai Hakdang on the Christian based ideology and lives of Appenzeller's children who followed their father's educational and religious conviction. In particular, Appenzeller's handwritten diary and pictures taken by himself will give people a glimpse of the way foreign missionaries thought of Korea.

 

6. Lives of Henry Dodge Appenzeller and Ruth Nobel Appenzeller

This is an introduction of the lives of Henry Dodge Appenzeller who came to Korea following his father and became the Principal of Pai Chai Hakdang, and his wife Ruth Noble Appenzeller. Through their life story, we can get a glimpse of their love and devotion to Korea. The desk, chair and typewriter used by Henry Dodge Appenzeller during his years as the Principal of Pai Chai Hakdang are displayed as well as the piano, passport, alien residence certificate and driver's license.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. Henry G. APPENZELLER Memorial Museum

(Chungdong First Methodist Church)

Address : 46, Jeongdong-gil, Jung-gu, Seoul

 

 

Rev. Henry Gerhard Appenzeller (February 6, 1858 June 11, 1902) was the first Methodist missionary to Korea. He and the American Presbyterian missionary Horace Underwood both arrived in Korea in 1885, following soon after the first Protestant Christian missionary in Korea, Presbyterian Horace N. Allen, who had arrived in 1884. While Allen worked as a medical missionary, Appenzeller and Underwood were posted to Korea as teachers. Appenzeller established a school in 1885 that still exists today, and in 1887 he established the first Methodist congregation in Korea.

 

Just as important as establishing the Methodist Church in Korea, which held a place close to his heart, Appenzeller felt a commitment to bringing American style democracy and capitalism to Korea. He believed that Korea needed both Protestantism and modernization, especially American modernization, to thrive and prosper as an independent nation and through his considerable efforts in this direction he helped lay the foundations of modern Korea.

 

Early Life and Training

Born in 1858 in Souderton, Pennsylvania, Henry Appenzeller was the second of three sons born to Gideon and Maria Gerhard Appenzeller. His family attended the Emmanuel Reformed Church and gathered every week to read the Bible at home. After attending West Chester Normal School, he graduated from Franklin and Marshall College in 1882, and then attended the Drew Theological Seminary. During his college years he transferred his membership from the Reformed Church to the Methodist Church, and in 1885 was ordained to the ministry and appointed as a Methodist missionary to Korea in San Francisco. He married in December 1884, and his wife, Ella Dodge Appenzeller, accompanied him when he sailed for Korea to take up his mission.

 

Transplanting the Family to Korea

After leaving the U.S. on February 1, 1885, Henry and Ella Appenzeller arrived at Jemulpo (now Incheon) on April 5, after a stop in Japan. Deciding that the atmosphere in Korea was not yet settled down after the coup attempt the previous December, they returned to Japan after five days, where they stayed until returning permanently to Korea in mid June. After settling into their mission house in Hanyang (Seoul), Appenzeller began to travel throughout the country, preparing to teach God's word. His oldest daughter, Alice, born five months later, was the first American baby born in Korea. The Appenzellers also had a son and two more daughters in Korea.

 

Working for Education

 

Appenzeller with some of his students

As he traveled around Korea, Appenzeller became concerned about the lack of educational opportunities for women and commoners in the country, where only the sons of the upper classes had access to a good education. With free (compulsory) education available to all children and college education open to women in his homeland since the mid-nineteenth century, Appenzeller wanted to make the same opportunities available to the people of his new homeland.

 

Appenzeller opened the first western-style school in the country in 1885, beginning by teaching English, and in 1886, King Gojong endorsed its official name, Pai Chai Hak Dang (Hall for the Rearing of Useful Men) and also provided an official plaque confirming the school's royal accreditation. The Methodist Missionary Board financed construction of a strong new brick building to house the school in 1887, built only one story high, in order to adhere to the royal court's decree that any buildings constructed nearby the palace should not be higher than the palace. In 1895 Pai Chai added additional departments, moving a step closer to today's Paichai University.

 

Foundations of the Methodist Church in Korea

 

Chongdong Methodist Church in Seoul, established by Henry G. Appenzeller

The Pennsylvania native baptized his first Korean convert on Easter Sunday in 1887, and by Christmas had gathered the first Methodist congregation in Korea, which developed into the Bethel Church and later the Chongdong First Methodist Church. He made many tours throughout the country, traveling on foot, by bicycle, and on horseback, speaking about the Gospel of Jesus. He studied the Korean language five hours a day so that he could preach in Korean, and in order to participate in the translation of the Bible into Korean with other missionaries.

Discovering that virtually all of the local literature was written not in Korean, but in Chinese, which meant that most of the population could not read it, he opened a bookstore in 1894, which later expanded to become Methodist Printing and Publishing House, in order to provide reading materials printed in Korean and English, both to teach the gospels and to expand literacy among the common people. The publishing house also revived a monthly magazine originally published by Rev. F. Ohlinger, Korea Repository, to teach Americans about Korea and its people.

 

Social Ministry

 

A glimpse of Korea during the time Appenzeller served there

 

As a Progressive, Appenzeller was concerned by many aspects of late Joseon Korean society. Unaware of how to cure people with cholera, they often left people outside to die. Appenzeller and his colleagues, even with minor medical training, saved many lives in the cholera epidemic of 1895.

 

Realizing that the Korean people neglected to use their well-crafted writing system, hangeul, since the upper classes wrote in Chinese, and many in the lower classes could not read, Appenzeller became impassioned with providing a well-translated hangeul version of the Bible to the Korean people. He set about creating schools to help many people learn to read hangeul, and he worked hard at learning Korea and translating the Bible. The Bible was the best piece of literature available to many of his students, and they read it in earnest.

 

Korean Independence Movement

 

Independence Gate in Seoul

Appenzeller firmly believed that God had called him, and other American missionaries, to remake Korea in America's image. He strove not only to plant Christianity, and especially Methodism, in Korea, but also to establish the American institutions of democracy and capitalism. He supported and encouraged the adoption of new technology from America, including street cars, automobiles, electricity, lighting, and late nineteenth century agricultural techniques. His school, Pai Chai Hak Dong, became a center for the Progressive Movement in Korea, educating future president Syngman Rhee and working with Progressive leaders Philip Jaisohn and Yun Chi-ho. Appenzeller walked a delicate line between fully supporting Emperor Gojong and Empress Myeongseong while fully supporting the Progressive agenda promoting democracy.

 

Death in Maritime Accident

 

In 1902, at the age of 44, Appenzeller was traveling on the Kumagawa, a ship of the Osaka Navigation Company, to the southern port city, Mokpo, to attend a meeting of the Bible Translation Committee. As they traveled through the night, another ship from the same company, the Kisogawa strayed into the path of the Kumagawa and the two ships collided. Most of the passengers on the Kumagawa, including Appenzeller, were drowned. He was later buried at the Yanhwajin Foreigners' Cemetery, the grave site of 40 missionaries sent by the United Methodist Church and its predecessor denominations in the late 1800s and early 1900s.

 

Legacy

The Korean Methodist Church, which got its start with Henry Appenzeller and the missionaries who followed him, has dramatically developed as one of major Protestant denominations in Korea. By 2000, the denomination had more than five thousand churches, 1.3 million members and seven thousand ministers. Korea has six universities established under the Methodist model, including Paichai, as well as Methodist Theological Seminary in Seoul. It also had six theological institutes and 54 junior high and high schools. As a staunch supporter of Korean independence, democracy, and education, Appenzeller has been honored posthumously with the Presidential Medal of Honor. Thanks to the efforts Appenzeller and the nineteenth century missionaries to establish schools in Korea, the country has achieved a literacy rate of almost 98 percent.

 

Two of Appenzeller's children, his oldest daughter Alice Rebecca Appenzeller and his son Henry Dodge Appenzeller, also offered many years of their lives in the service of Korea, Alice as the president of Ewha Womans University, Korea's first college for women, and Henry at the Paichai School his father had started.

 

출처 : New World Encyclopedia

 

3. Ewha Museum

Address : 140, Bugahyeon-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul

 

 

The first girls' school in Korea began with a single pupil. The young woman, who came from a household of Kim. came to the school in may of 1886 with hopes of becoming an English translator for Empress Myeongseong and was taught at the home of founder and head of school. Mary F. Scranton.

The second student was a girl known as "Byeol-dan". Her impoverished mother brought her to Principal Scranton when circumstances made it too difficult to raise the girl. however, the mother returned for her daughter after only a few months, afraid Mrs. Scranton would try to take the girl overseas. Principal Scranton assured the mother that she would never take Byeoldan out of the country, writing a letter attesting to the fact. With principal Scranton's reassurance. Byeol-dan stayed on at Ewha hakdang and became the institution's first permanent student.

The next permanent student was named Kkon-nim and came to the school when she was only four years old. In the summer of 1886. cholera ran rampant throughout Seoul. The disease devastated the population, and as the season progressed, the bodies of victims piled up outside the castle walls. D. William Scranton, the son of Principal Scranton, found Kkon-nim abandoned and wandering the neighborhood of Seodaemun alone, and brought the child to the school to be cared for.

The fourth student was Kim Jeom-dong. or Esther Park, who later became Korea's first female physician. on the strength of her studies at Ewha hakdang. Dr. Park went to the United States to study medicine, and later returned to Korea to become the first practicing female doctor of Western medicine.

In November of 1886, the first school building for Ewha Hakdang was constructed where Ewha Girls' High School stands today. This 200-pyeong building housed classrooms accomodating 35 students, the principal's office, a teachers' office, and a dormitory. In 1887, Emperor Gojong bestowed on the school the name of Ewha hakdang, and recognized it as the first female educational institution in Korea.

 

 

B Hospital Tours

 

1. Yonsei Medical Center(홈페이지)

Address : 50-1 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul,

 

 

 

In the late 19th century, a turbulent time of political intrigue and burgeoning Western thought, Korea, the Hermit Kingdom, was struggling against Japanese expansionism. The last ruling royals were of the Yi Dynasty. It was then that modern medicine began in Korea, when Dr. Horace N. Allen, a Protestant missionary doctor from the Presbyterian Missions in New York, arrived in Seoul.

 

In December of 1884, Dr. Allen was given the opportunity of saving the life of the nephew of powerful Queen Min. In gratitude, at the behest of King Kojong, the Royal Hospital Kwang Hye Won, which means "House of Extended Grace," was founded. Soon after, this was renamed Che Jung Won or "Universal Helpfulness". The King appointed Dr. Allen as head of the hospital, after whom Dr. Charles C. Vinton and Dr. Oliver R. Avison successfully carried on his work. Dr. Allen and his colleague, Dr. J. W Heron, went further, establishing a medical school in 1886. They named it Che Jung Won Medical School - the basis for modem medical education in Korea. In 1894, the Presbyterian North Mission was given control of the hospital from the government, and since then it has been a distinctly missionary institution. In the early years, hospital care was furnished in a remodeled, though small, traditional Korean building. However, it was determined that an adequate facility needed to be erected, and so in 1899, Dr. Avison was authorized, this time by the Mission Board, to raise a sum of $10,000. In addition, plans and estimates were drawn up. At the Ecumenical Missionary Conference in New York in 1900, Dr. Avison presented his proposal entitled, "Comity in Medical Missions". Mr. Louis H. Severance, an American philanthropist in the audience, was enthralled upon hearing the speech.

 

Mr. Severance then decided that Seoul would be on ideal place to build a hospital- a project he had been planning for years. He arranged to meet Dr. Avison and was shown the plans and quotations. In a few days a donation of $10,000 was secured. The hospital was completed in September of 1904 - the first modem hospital in Korea. It was named "Severance Memorial Hospital". Subsequently, the original donation was increased to approximately $25,000, which was used for the acquisition of more land and equipment and for more buildings to be built. Even after Mr. Severance's death, his son and daughter graciously continued to support the hospital.

 

The first regular class of medical students was enrolled in 1900. The beginning of modern medical education, however, dates back to 1886, during which medical instruction continued, even though it did not take on a regular and systemic form. The first class of seven men graduated in June of 1908. The school by then was named "Severance Hospital Medical School". After the graduation of the first class, efforts were then undertaken to unite the various missions that were involved in the school at the time. Until 1912, hospital care could hardly be termed "united", for doctors from various missions other than Presbyterian North, had been offering assistance in courses and lectures, and they were not in truth "residents". That year, however, marked a new phase into the medical school's future.

 

The Southern Presbyterian Mission appointed Dr. Kung Sun Oh as the first Korean dean of the school. This was soon followed by the appointment of staff from different Mission Boards, i.e., the Southern Methodist Mission, the Methodist Episcopal Mission and the Australian Presbyterian Mission. The name of the medical school was aptly changed to "Severance Union Medical College (SUMC)".

 

As the number of graduates increased, the faculty of the school, at the time mainly consisting of missionary doctors, was gradually replaced by its own graduates. SUMC remained the only medical school for Koreans, operated by Koreans until the end of the Japanese colonization. During these difficult years of Japanese rule and the transitional period after World War II, deeply dedicated leaders led Severance. This began with Dr. Kung Sun Oh, who succeeded Dr. Avison, followed by Dr Yong Joon Rhee, Dr. Dong Choy, Dr. Yong Sul Lee, and Dr. Myung Sun Kim.

 

The outbreak of the Korean War tragically saw more than 80% of the buildings and facilities destroyed. But, the staff and students set up refugee hospitals on Koje Island, at Chungdo and Wonju, in hope that Severance would continue to function as a hospital and medical school. The old Severance building was partially restored and used until 1962.

 

The merger of Severance Union Medical College and Chosun Christian University to form the new Yonsei University in January of 1957 was the realization of a decades-old dream. Dr. Myung Sun Kim, the former president of Severance Union Medical College, became the vice-president for Medical Affairs at Yonsei University. In 1955, the construction of Yonsei University Medical Center was undertaken on the campus of Chosun Christian University. This was accomplished with the help of the U.S. 8th Army, the United Board for Christian Higher Education in Asia, the China Medical Board and Alumni of SUMC.

 

The 8th Army aided in the creation of the Memorial Chest Surgery Hospital; the United Board, the General Ward Hospital; the China Medical Board, a basic science building and library; and SUMC alumni, outpatient clinics. In 1962, the former Severance Union Medical College and Hospital were moved to the present Yonsei University Campus, a beautiful 15-acre site located in the western portion of Seoul.

 

Yonsei University College of Medicine continued to advance to meet the challenges of constant change in, the need for leadership in medical education and in the Christian ministry of healing. In 1968, the first electron microscope in Korea was installed, and a cardiac laboratory and intensive care unit were added to the hospital. In 1969, a 4 -story wing functioning as a private ward was added. This was expanded to 10 stories in 1979. The Speech and Hearing Center was established that same year.

 

The Yonsei Cancer Center was also founded in 1969 as a joint effort between the Korean government and Yonsei Medical Center to meet the needs of those afflicted with cancer from around the nation. It was equipped with the most up-to-date radiotherapeutic and diagnostic facilities at that time. In 1973, the Basic Science Building was expanded and a new library building was constructed. In 1975, the Kwang Wha Community Health Teaching Center was fonned with the support of the Protestant Central Agency for Development Aid (EZE) of West Gennany and the United Board for Christian Higher Education in Asia.

 

In 1983, a new 400-bed hospital was built in Gangnam, an area south of the Han River. Following this, in 1987, as part of the Centennial Projects, construction of the Yonsei Rehabilitation Center, restoration of the first Korean hospital (Kwang Hye Won), and construction of the Allen Memorial Guesthouse were completed. In the wake of international trends, the hospital began decentralization into a complex of specialized centers in 1992, beginning with a 240-bed Cardiovascular Center. Kwangju Severance Psychiatric Hospital opened in 1993 and a specialized institute for Ophthalmology and ENT opened in 1996.

 

The new Severance Hospital building was built in 2005. Avision Bio-Medical Research Center opened in 2013 and became the center of state-of art researches. Yonsei Cancer Center had its grand opening in 2004 and is providing comprehensive­ multidisciplinary treatment to patients with Cancer. As Yonsei has always been, Yonsei University Health System is the pioneer of medicine in Korea.

 

The Yonsei University College of Medicine Alumni Association has played many crucial roles in the continued growth and expansion of the Yonsei University Health System. The Chejung Haksa (1974), then- state of the art dormitory for medical students, the Mooak 3 Haksa (1998) dormitory, and the Allen Memorial Guesthouse were erected by the Alumni Association. The Kwang Hye Won - the birthplace of Yonsei University - was also restored within the campus by the Alumni Association.

 

Currently, there are approximately 10,100 employees throughout the Health System, which include some 2,500 physicians and 7,600 nurses and administration staffs. Yonsei Medical College enrolls 110 students every year, has more than 540 full time faculty members and over 1,000 full-time fellows and staff. In addition, a total of 24,000 students have graduated from the colleges and graduate schools. The hospitals have around 3,700 beds and see around 4 million outpatients and 1 million inpatients annually.

 

All facilities at YUHS are modern and state-of-the-art medical equipment, and are operated by a ubiquitous information system that digitally links all organizations together efficiently. With these infrastructures, YUHS continues to develop by balancing education, research and patient care, which together are helping it to realize its mission of freeing humankind from disease and suffering with the love of God.

 

Based on more than 130 years of experience in medicine, YUHS will strive to be a leader in the industrialization and globalization of medicine, thus helping it to achieve its goal of becoming the medical hub of Northeast Asia.